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News & Press: Outside Sources

Work Life Integration: The New Norm

Wednesday, August 13, 2014   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Allison Kimble
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"Now, the new phrase is “work life integration,” where professionals have to blend what they do personally and professionally in order to make both work. Many professionals, especially boomers, aren’t prepared for this major shift because it’s happened so fast, just like the speed of technology, that it’s been hard to take a step back and come up with a better solution. Millennials, on the other hand, have already started to adapt to this reality. They’re on Facebook talking to their friends at work and answering business emails when they leave the office.

There are a few reasons why mastering work life integration are so essential right now:

1. The boundaries between family and career are blurred. The demands of the workplace are greater because business never sleeps and companies are trying to do more with fewer resources. In a study by the Association for Women in Science (AWIS), the found that more than 50% of workers say that work conflicts with life responsibilities at least two or three times per week. Due to this, about 40% of women have delayed having children. It’s hard to know when and when you aren’t working these days because technology has enabled us to message personal or professional contacts instantly. Many of us millennials also suffer from the fear of missing out (FOMO) so we’re always tuned into Facebook, Instagram and other platforms to make sure that we never miss a moment in our friends lives. In addition, a lot of employees have one phone or business and personal so it becomes impossible to avoid either."

Read the rest of the article in Forbes!


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